theme-sticky-logo-alt

10 No-Fuss Ways to Figuring Out Your uncaught referenceerror: invalid left-hand side in assignment

0 Comments

The referenceerror is one of the most frustrating things to come across in the JavaScript community. Many developers refer to it as the “Uncaught ReferenceError” because it is so hard to spot the problem.

To make matters worse, the error message contains the source of the error, not the problem at hand. The error message is basically something like “Invalid expression”, “An error occurred”, or “The expression was not evaluated correctly”. It could be interpreted as if you had used a var, a function, or an assignment expression in the wrong order, but it’s not something you can rely on. There’s not really much you can do about it.

With this in mind, to figure out that your code is not functioning as intended you need to look at the error message. In this case, it seems that you are trying to assign two things on the same line, which is absolutely the wrong way to do it. This error message is pretty clear on the issue. One thing that is different is that it tells you that the problem came from a left-hand side assignment.

In your code you must always use a left-hand side assignment. If you do, it doesn’t matter what you assign it. If you don’t assign a left-hand side assignment, then it just tells you that the code you are trying to do is incorrect. This is not the case here. It’s also a nice idea to always assign a left-hand side assignment.

The way you assign a left-hand side assignment is important, and yet left-hand side assignment is so rarely used in programming that its value is hard to quantify, even to the people who use it. It has come a long way. For example, the most common case is for an if statement to have a left-hand side assignment. Yet in the modern world we all use the same syntax for the assignment operator.

In this case, it’s not really a left-hand side, but rather an assignment to a variable with the left-hand side. So it’s a little strange to see this, but more often than not we see things like this when we assign to a variable with a left-hand side.

Sometimes its not a left-hand side, but rather an assignment to a variable with a right-hand side. But this doesn’t always happen. For example, in some cases we can assign to a variable with a left-hand side, but not a right-hand side. In this example, the assignment to the variable with the left-hand side is invalid, but the assignment to the variable with the right-hand side is valid.

I’m not always able to get the details on this, but I seem to be one of those people who doesn’t look at the left-hand side of an assignment until I’m about to send them away.

This happens because an assignment to a variable that is not used before the assignment to the variable with the right-hand side is invalid. This is most often used when a variable with a right-hand side is used as an argument to another function, like in this example.

We’ve all been there, the moment the right-hand side of an assignment is mentioned, and then its not clear if the left-hand side is being used as a argument. The rule of thumb is that you should look at the left-hand side of an assignment until your eyes convince you otherwise.

Previous
Next

0 Comments

Leave a Reply

15 1 0 4000 1 https://a1meatsupply.com 300 0